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Gateway to Spectroscopy > Physical Background > History of Spectroscopy > Late 20th century

Late 20th century

  • 1951 - E M Purcell and R V Pound first observed net induced emission.
  • 1951-2 - C H Townes, Nikolai G Basov and Alexandr M Prokhorov first suggested the principle of the maser.
  • 1953 - Zernike awarded the Nobel Prize for phase-contrast microscope
  • 1954 - Alan Walsh invented the atomic absorption spectometer (AAS)
  • 1960 - T H Maiman demonstrated the first simple laser.
  • 1965 - S J I L Greenfield invented 'high-power' ICP
  • 1966 - Alfred Kastler awarded Nobel Prize for optical methods for studying atomic energy levels.
  • 1967 - W Grimm invented his glow discharge source.
  • 1968 - Grimm presented the first quantitative analysis with his new source.
  • 1969 - V A Fassel and P W J M Boumans developed 'low-power' ICP.
  • 1970 - J E Greene and J M Whelan reported the first depth profile with the Grimm glow discharge source.
  • 1972 - C J Belle and J D Johnson reported the first quantitative depth profile with the Grimm source.
  • 1972 - Boumans determined the main characteristics of the Grimm glow discharge.
  • 1973 - Charlotte E Moore published extensive tables of atomic energy levels.
  • 1975 - Roger Berneron demonstrated the wide capabilities of GD-OES for qualitative depth profiling.
  • 1978 - Ritzl produced the first commercial GD-OES instrument using the Grimm source.
  • 1985 - J Pons-Corbeau introduced the first algorithm for quantitative depth profiling in GD-OES.
  • 1988 - M Chevrier and Richard Passetemps invented the first radio frequency powered Grimm source.

First published on the web: 15 March 2000.

Author: Richard Payling, Surface Analytical